Balancing Productivity with Security

As workers find new and creative ways to use the web, organizations struggle to maintain control of the corporate network while empowering employees, partners, and other stakeholders with access to critical functionality. A staggering number of new applications have emerged and the number grows daily. Complicating matters is the fact that what is considered a “good” versus “bad” application is no longer a clear-cut issue. Some applications are intended purely for business purposes and are carefully designed to minimize security risks and maximize productivity. At the other end of the risk continuum are applications programmed to steal data, corrupt computers, and disrupt network activity. A huge variety of applications fall into the gray area between these extremes.

Application Evolution Complicates Security

While IT administrators were once apt to deny access to applications whose origins were found in the consumer world, such an approach is increasingly problematic. After all, applications such as Facebook have proven quite valuable for many in the business world, particularly sales and marketing groups. In fact, 1.5 million local businesses maintain active pages on Facebook. (For this and other interesting Facebook facts, see At the same time, Facebook games can be productivity zappers, and if they contain malware, they also pose a security risk.

Read more here.